Limed Oak Panel Casket

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Limed Oak Panel Casket

3,959.00

Style: Raised panel with solid mount handles
Material: Wisconsin red oak
Color: Limed oak
Finish: Water-based white glaze
Upholstery: Pearl Pink Cotton

Quantity:
I Want One

An Uncommon Tale of Imitation

The first appearance of limed oak, or cerused oak, dates back to 16th century England.  Also a popular cosmetic at the time, Venetian ceruse was a white paste made by mixing lead and vinegar.

After nearly 300 years of use as a cosmetic and having been determined culpable in the 1603 death of Queen Elizabeth I, ceruse was classified as a poison and no longer used in cosmetics. The mixture remained popular as a wood finish in flooring and cabinetry for another century.

American architects and furniture makers revived the appearance of limed oak in the late 1800s with pastes made from slaked lime, or calcium hydroxide paste, also a key ingredient in mortar and cement.  The whitened glaze style applied to oak experienced another revival in the Art Deco Era and has since been revived again in contemporary modern architecture. 

This casket is glazed with a water-based whitewash made by General Finishes in East Troy, Wisconsin and upholstered in soft pearl pink cotton with delicate pin-tucks throughout. 

Plant it Forward.

Pledge to use this casket in your end-of-life plan and we'll plant 100 trees this year.  And 100 more next year. And another 100 trees every year thereafter. Your pledge costs nothing and takes 5 minutes.  Pledge today.